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New World Library Unshelved

New World Library Unshelved

Positive news and inspiring views from the New World Library community


Thursday, April 09, 2015
FIVE TIPS FOR PARENTING WITH PRESENCE by guest blogger Susan Stiffelman, author of PARENTING WITH PRESENCE, an Eckhart Tolle Edition
 

In Parenting with Presence, marriage and family therapist Susan Stiffelman offers proven, practical strategies to help parents navigate the ups and downs of real-life child rearing with greater consciousness, while learning to subdue the triggers that make them lose (or temporarily misplace) their equanimity. Susan’s book is the inaugural title in our new Eckhart Tolle Editions imprint, which features books hand-selected for publication by the bestselling author of The Power of Now.

We’d like to invite you to be part of a conversation between Susan and singer-songwriter Alanis Morissette on Tuesday, April 14th, at 12:30 p.m. about the ideas in Parenting with Presence. This free event promises to be a thought-provoking, heart-opening dialogue between two passionate parents about the possibilities for growth and transformation that come with raising a child. Visit Susan’s website to register for the live stream, or for the recording if you are unable to make the live event.

# # #

I had meditated since I was sixteen, so as I approached motherhood, I was certain I would be spared those dramatic, stressful moments I saw frazzled parents having with their children. Yelling or shouting? I would be too centered to succumb to that level of frustration. Trying to rush my child to get where we were going? I was confident about my ability to slow down and live in the moment.

Ha!

In theory, parenting with presence sounds easy enough. Putting it into practice in real time with real children is another thing altogether. No one can push our buttons the way our kids can — ignoring repeated requests to come to dinner after we’ve made something healthy and tasty, or refusing to stay in their beds when we’ve run out of steam and desperately want to go to sleep. Sometimes we lose our cool — and our way.

Parenting shows us just how human we are. Humbling, yes, but if we relax into the experience rather than resist the difficult moments, it can be one of the greatest opportunities we will ever have to learn how to love more deeply, live more fully in the moment, and become more openhearted versions of ourselves. It’s a blessing of untold magnitude, but one with a never-ending invitation to stretch and grow.

Here are a few of the things I have learned about parenting with presence:

Be good enough. Our children don’t need us to be saintly or enlightened. We just need to be good enough. Don’t allow mean, critical voices in your head to tell you that you’re not adequately conscious or evolved. That voice — the one telling you that if you were more “spiritual,” you wouldn’t yell at your kids — is not your friend. Only when our heart is at ease with our imperfections can we truly embrace the opportunities for spiritual growth that come with being a parent. When you lose your way, touch your heart with a “There, there” as you would comfort a child, and begin anew.

When your buttons get pushed, look beneath the surface. None of us like being ignored or dealing with tantrums. But when we feel especially triggered by our child’s unpleasant behavior, unfinished business from our own childhood may be rearing its ugly head. If your child’s anger makes your blood boil, it may be rekindling memories of a parent’s explosive temper. If you feel painfully disrespected when your kids pretend they don’t hear you, it may be activating the hurt of being ignored as a child. Our children can be invaluable beacons of light, illuminating our emotional dark corners to catalyze deep healing and open us to extraordinary dimensions of love and acceptance.

Commit to moments of full engagement. Most of us juggle the demands of our lives by giving partial attention to each activity without being fully present for any of them. We listen halfheartedly to our child’s story about show-and-tell while our wandering mind thinks over the emails we need to send. We rush our kids through brushing their teeth, counting the moments until we can fall wearily into bed. When our kids sense our divided attention, they often generate chaos and drama to bring all of us into the room, even if their behavior results in threats or punishments. Focus on the one thing you’re doing, whether it’s serving a snack or changing a diaper. Investing even a few moments of fully engaged time with your kids can bring greater joy to your parenting life.

Challenge fear. Many parents are driven by anxiety. What will happen if she doesn’t finish her homework? What if he refuses to eat dinner . . . again? When we are ruled by fear, we tend to come across to our children as desperate and needy, effectively putting them in charge of our happiness. Make friends with the worst-case scenario so it has less of a hold over you.

Unplug. These days it is nearly impossible to visit a park and not find parents checking their devices while the kids play, or strolling their baby while chatting on their cell phone. Rarely do you see families in a restaurant without at least one person — often a child — on some kind of digital device. We all know that the digital revolution has brought amazing things to our lives, but our children need regular doses of our presence. Yes, it’s great that you can reach out for the support of your cyber-tribe when you’re feeling isolated with little kids. But the next time your cell phone beeps, try staying a little longer in the 3-D world.

My now twenty-four-year-old son walks into the house as I’m finishing up this article. I feel the tug of my writing, but the pull on my heart is stronger, and I stand up to share a hug and a few moments of “How’ve ya been?” as we catch up after not seeing each other for a few days.

I have enjoyed many soul-nurturing experiences in my life, but to this day, seeing my son still splits open my heart like nothing else can. Through the many rough patches and the countless days when I fell miles short of being as conscious as I had hoped to be, this love remains. Pure, perfect, and miraculous.

# # #

SUSAN STIFFELMAN, MFT, is the bestselling author of Parenting with Presence and Parenting Without Power Struggles. She is a licensed marriage and family therapist, a credentialed teacher, and the Huffington Post’s weekly “Parent Coach” advice columnist. She lives in Malibu, California, where she is an aspiring banjo player, a determined tap-dancer, and an optimistic gardener. Visit her online at ParentingwithPresence.com.

Based on the book Parenting with Presence: Practices for Raising Conscious, Confident, Caring Kids. Copyright © 2015 by Susan Stiffelman.








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